Posts Tagged ‘shopping’

Fairtrade Vs Normal…PRICE WAR!!

Thursday, February 19th, 2009

Beer 500ml

FAIRTRADE £1.85  NORMAL £1.85

Biscuits 125g

FAIRTRADE £1.23   NORMAL £1.15

Tea Bags (80bags)

FAIRTRADE £2.62    NORMAL £2.05

Instant coffee 100g

FAIRTRADE £1.79    NORMAL £2.98

Sugar Granulated Sugar 1kg

FAIRTRADE 97p   NORMAL £1.59*

Honey 340g

FAIRTRADE £2.39  NORMAL £1.95

Bananas

FAIRTRADE £1.25 per kg   NORMAL £1.09 per kg

TOTALS**

Fairtrade £12.10

Normal £12.66

*only non Fairtrade alternative

**based on buying 1 kg of bananas

2009: A Local Food Odyssey

Thursday, January 22nd, 2009

What made you believe in being a local shopper?

I think it began because I’m generally passionate about food so I enjoy the experience  of going out and exploring and finding new shops. So it really grew from there, I found going to the local traders much more enjoyable than going to big supermarkets. Generally the people in the independent shops know the products better and get to know you as well, which is a touch I really like.

Why do you feel it’s important more students shop locally?

There are thousands of students moving into communities in cities across the country every year. All too often we just move into the area and live there for 3 years only going to the local supermarket. I think wouldn’t it give the local economy a huge boost if even half of those students decided to get most of their shopping from local butchers and green grocers that source from local farms? It really is sad to see in some areas all the closed down shops that were once part of a thriving community.

What do you think is stopping more students shopping locally?

Mostly I think knowledge – students don’t know where to find the shops, maybe don’t even know they’re even there. I also think in some cases there is a bit of fear in that lots of people don’t know what to ask for in a butchers so they don’t try. Hopefully they’ll see from the film it’s not daunting at all. On the other hand though I can see why some people stick to the security of the supermarket – because they source from all over the world they’re rarely out of stock and you can get things out of season, whereas shopping locally you do have to buy more seasonally.

Going, Going, Gone?: Shopping Locally In Liverpool

Tuesday, January 20th, 2009

When it comes to the battle between the independent food shop or the supermarket, it’s pretty obvious who’s got the upper hand.  While independent stores have more knowledgeable staff and generally fresher produce, they are often more expensive and have limited opening hours, not to mention their scattered locations across the town or city.  Supermarkets, on the other hand, are ironically now on every street corner, taking the place of the corner shop.  They’re open for longer, have more variety and now sell not only food, but books, TVs, petrol and insurance.  They truly are a one stop shop for everything you need in your modern life.

For every £10 spent on the high street, £7 is spent at a supermarket, so it’s no wonder that independent greengrocers, butchers and fishmongers are drastically on the decline.  But how did this all happen?

It started in the 50s when an idea from the States came across the ocean and spread in Britain.  Instead of going into a shop and being served by a shopkeeper, the idea was reversed and the customer became their own server, having more time to think about and choose the products they wanted.  Supermarkets became incredibly popular because they needed fewer staff (and therefore lower staff costs), allowed more products to be stored (meaning greater bargaining power with the suppliers), and ultimately created greater choice for the customer.

As this choice grew, naturally so did the size of the supermarkets, meaning many were set up out of the city centre.  Even though they were now out of town, they tempted customers from any independent stores left on the high street by staying open for longer and providing car park spaces.

As their success and profits grew, soon they became the only output for supplier’s products, and with this monopoly, were able to have more control over supplier’s prices.  Suppliers were left with a choice-sell large amounts of their products to supermarkets who wanted it at a low price, or sell a few boxes to a little store who were willing to pay a bit more but would sell far far less.

Supermarkets’ convenience in location and what they sold along with their competitive pricing quickly put an end to the popularity of independent shops.  But should we be that bothered that these little stores are closing down?  After all, isn’t it the independent shops’ inability to keep up with consumer change that’s part of their downfall?

The one thing that independent stores have and supermarkets sorely miss is their level of customer care and the roots that independent stores have with the local economy.  Greengrocers, fishmongers and butchers will all be experts in their trades, knowing how to prepare, cook and store all their products.  They’ll be able to advise you on the best way of cooking what you buy, are more likely to give you discounts or give you items for free, and generally take more care over the service you receive.  They have to do more to keep you as a customer.  Generally, they’ll also source their ingredients locally, putting more money back into the local economy, financially helping the people that produce the food you eat, and keeping down emissions by lowering travelling miles and costs.

But is there a place for these independent shops on today’s high street?  It’s difficult to see how they can survive under such strong competition from the big supermarket chains, especially when supermarkets are more conveniently located and have longer opening hours.  The irony now is that supermarkets are now moving back onto the high street and opening up ‘Metro’ versions of their stores, now replacing the independent corner shops that sell milk at 10 at night.  Independent shops have got a big fight ahead of them to keep their place on the high street.

If you want to find out more about the places Rachel visited on the film here are some links to their websites:

http://www.liverpool.gov.uk/Leisure_and_culture/Markets/index.asp

http://www.claremontfarm.co.uk/

Top Tips for saving the pennies!

Saturday, October 18th, 2008

Whether you’ve just got your loan through and have money to burn, or you’re at the end of term and are struggling to pay for a pint, the one thing you’ll have to spend money on throughout your whole time at uni is…food. So it makes sense to work out how to get the most for your money and how to waste as little of it as possible!

Here’s a few hints and tips to help you save those pennies:

• Try planning your weeks’ meals
You don’t have to do this every week, but it definitely helps you save! Work out what you’ll be eating throughout the week and the ingredients you’ll need, then draw up a shopping list. When you go shopping – stick to it! This should mean you won’t spend money on stuff you don’t need, saving your cash for that all important pint at the union.

• Look out for special offers
Keep your eye out in the supermarket for any special offers such as Buy One Get One Frees or Half Price offers. These are great ways to save money.

• Try shopping at the market
Although you may think it’s the place where your gran goes to buy her pound of mince, the market is a great place to shop when you’re a student. Unlike the supermarket, you can buy things in much smaller quantities, meaning it’s loads cheaper. Market traders will also knock off a couple of quid or give you a student discount; something most supermarkets won’t do! One last thing-people at the market will be able to tell you how to cook what you’ve bought. So if you’re not quite sure how to cook that piece of cod you’ve just bought, ask and they’ll be able to help you!

• Remember to freeze!
If you buy more meat or fish than you need, then remember you can always freeze it and have it for another night. Whatever you buy, split it up once you’ve bought it and separate it out into freezer bags. Label it up then pop it in the freezer and defrost it the day before you want to use it.

• Buy supermarket-own brand
Supermarket own-brand products taste pretty much the same and are usually cheaper than any big name products. When you’re cooking at uni, you won’t be able to taste much difference between the two, but you’ll save a lot of cash.

Food shopping in Loughborough?

Thursday, October 16th, 2008

Check this out!

There are loads of other markets and great shopping areas all around Loughborough as well as the ones Lucy showed us on her tour. It’s fun to get out there and find them for yourself but just to point you in the right direction, we’d say check out these websites for more useful info – Charnwood Council (markets in general) and again, Charnwood Council but especially Farmers Markets.

Shopping in Sheffers

Wednesday, October 15th, 2008

There are loads of other markets and great shopping areas all around Sheffield as well as the ones Tom showed us on his tour. It’s fun to get out there and find them for yourself but just to point you in the right direction, we’d recommend checking out the Sheffield City Council website (info on ALL the markets – v useful!), as well as Sheffield Central.

Best Bargains around the Toon!

Monday, October 13th, 2008

There are loads of other markets and great shopping areas all around Newcastle as well as the ones Lorna showed us on her tour. It is fun to get out there and find them for yourself but just to point you in the right direction, check these websites out for more info – Newcastle City Council (more about the Grainger Market) and Newcastle Gateshead (your guide to things going on in the toon!).

Top Tips for shopping in Liverpool

Friday, October 10th, 2008

There are loads of other markets and great shopping areas all around Liverpool as well as the ones Georgia showed us on her tour. It’s fun to get out there and find them for yourself but just to point you in the right direction, it’s worth checking out the Liverpool City Council website for more info about markets, as well as Liverpool’s Heritage Market website – great for more info!

Useful links for shopping in Leeds

Thursday, October 9th, 2008

There are loads of other markets and great shopping areas all around Leeds, as well as the ones Joe showed us on his tour. It’s fun to get out there and find them for yourself but just to point you in the right direction check out the Leeds Market and Leeds City Council websites!