Posts Tagged ‘market’

Food shopping in Bristol

Friday, September 9th, 2011

Bristol is a food lovers’ paradise, especially if you’re into buying locally – there’s so much on offer!

HIDDEN TREASURES (from a local Bristolian!)

Situated on St Marks Road, this specialist food company is legendary – selling all sorts of amazing Asian and Ethnic products.

St Marks Road
This whole street is generally amazing – offering a truly international flavour with great Indian sweet shops, vegetarian and curry type restaurants – here are a couple of favourites.

Know Your Stuff About Food In Egham?

Monday, September 13th, 2010


Budgens Is an excellent independent supermarket chain stocking a wide selection of essential, everyday items.  Just a 10 minute walk from campus or hop on one of the campus busses down to Egham

Budgens Supermarket

1-5 Station Road North
TW20 9LD

Tel: 01784 439 100

Open 24 hours


Egham Oriental Store has a good range of authentic international ingreidients from around the world.  Rosanna the owner is a fantastic local character and has promised to offer tips and advice with any recipes!

Egham Oriental Store
43 High Street

Tel: 01784 479 352

Open from 9:00 am to 5.30am


Ansells stocks a wide selection of meat reared in the local Surrey area.  Neil assures me that all the guys behind the counter are good cooks and know their meat inside out, sodont be afraid to seek his help!

Ansells Butchers
42 Bond street,
Englefield Green,

Tue – Fri 8:30 – 5:30

Sat 8:30-3:00

To reach Engelfield Green take the numbers 3 or the 441 busses from Egham.


Chertsey farm shop has a huge selection of locally produced fruit and vegetables. It also has an extensive range of international goods such as shitake mushrooms, fresh ginger and chili.

Chertsey Farm Shop

The Farm Shop Lyne Limited, Hardwick Lane, Lyne (Nr. Chertsey), Surrey, KT16 0AA

Directions on how to find the farm shop are at:

How To Find Food In St. Andrews!

Monday, September 13th, 2010

Tesco Metro
St. Andrews
KY16 9PD

Open 7.30am-23:59 Mon-Sat
10:00-22:00 Sunday

Medium sized supermarket situated in the centre of St. Andrews.  Good range of local products and Scottish foods, also good international aisles with some Indian, Chinese and Polish ingredients.

The Orchard
201 South Street
St. Andrews

Tel: 01334 472530

Open 9-5pm Monday to Sat.

A wonderful little greengrocers located in the centre of St. Andrews stocking a good selection of locally produced and imported fruits and vegetables.  Much of what’s on offer is relatively familiar but if you have any question or queries just ask!

Minick of St.Andrews

183 south street
St. Andrews,

Tel: 01334 472147

Open Monday to Saturday. 9-5pm

Fantastic butchers shop selling everything from fresh scottish Beef, Lamb, Chicken and             Pork to Scotch pies, Haggis and Eggs.  The owner is called Stewart and deals with many international students so if there is anything you are unsure of, just ask him.

Matthews Food LTD.

17-19 Gellatly Street

Tel: 01382 226 628

Open seven days a week: 9:30 am -5:30pm

Huge selection of foods from all over the world situated in the heart of Dundee.  This store stocks food from China, Japan, Korea, India, Thailand, Indonesia to name but a few.

To reach Dundee you can take the 99C bus from St. Andrews bus station

A train service operates between Leuchars and Dundee with up to two trains running every hour.

Shops In Bath

Monday, September 13th, 2010


Shaftesbury Rd,
Oldfield Park,

Tel: 01225 429 123

The supermarket can be a great place to get your hands on everyday essential items such as eggs, bread and milk.  For international students, you can usually find a decent selection of international ingredients

Twerton Market

Twerton Football ground Car Park

Tel: 01225 47 7101

A fantastic local farmers market open every Thursday from around 9:00 am until around 1:00pm.  With stalls ranging from butchers, fishmongers and greengrocers all selling a fantastic range of local Somerset foods.

Many of the market stall holders have experience with dealing with overseas students and are always willing to help

The market is easily reached by the number 18 bus, taken to Twerton parade.

International supermarket

Wai Yee Hong
Eastgate Oriental City
Eastgate Road,

Tel: 0845 873 3388

Wai Yee Hong is a fantastic place for UK students and overseas students to come along to and find themselves a vast range of authentic ingredients from all around the world.

To reach Bristol from Bath, take either the 339, 649 and the x39

There are regular trains from Bristol Temple Meads stations.

International Food Shopping in Leicester

Wednesday, May 12th, 2010

If you’d like to visit any of the shops and market stalls that Ainia and her friends visited, then you’ll find them below:

Leicester Market

9 Market Place South



0116 223 2371

Monday – Saturday: 7am-6pm

(Indoor market Tuesday – Saturday: 8am-5pm)

Asiana Supermarket

70 Brazil St



0116 255 3888

Monday: Friday 9am – 6pm

Saturday: 10am-4pm

Sunday: 11am – 4pm

More Info on Food Shopping in Loughborough

Friday, January 22nd, 2010

Even though it has a small town centre, Loughborough has got loads to offer when it comes to food shopping, especially when you’re looking for international ingredients.  Here’s a run down of what Pawel and Tas featured in the film:


Where: 21 Market St, Loughborough

Opening times:

Mon-Sat 09:00-18:00

Sun 10:00-16:00

Phone no: 01509 237 103


Where: 8 Market St, Loughborough

Opening Times:

Mon-Wed & Fri-Sat 07:00-19:00

Thu & Sun 10:00-16:00

Phone no: 01509 230 484


Where: Ashby Rd, Loughborough

Opening Times:

Mon-Sat 08:00-22:00

Sun 10:00-16:00

Phone no: 01509 237 724

Oriental Food Shop

Where: Ashby Square

Opening Times:

Mon-Sat 10:00-18:00


Phone no: 01509 219 625

Loughborough Market

Where: Loughborough town centre

Opening Times:

Thu & Sat 07:00-17:00

More info:

Loughborough Student Union Shop

Where: Student union

Opening Times:

Mon-Fri: 08:30-22:30

Sat: 08:30-17:30

Sun: 10:30-17:30

Phone no: 01509 635 000 (Student union switchboard)

More info on the Sprint Bus

The Sprint Bus stops at the following bus stops on Loughborough University campus:

1. Outside the Student Union

2. Outside the Mechanical Engineering building

3. Outside the Pilkington Library

Buses run every 10 minutes Monday to Friday, but less frequently on the weekend.  It costs £1.20 to get into town and £1.50 to get to the train station.  Return tickets are not available.

The journey should take 10 minutes from campus to town and 20 minutes from campus to the train station, however this is depending on traffic and can take longer.  To find out more, visit:

More Info On Leeds Food Shopping!

Monday, December 14th, 2009

Leeds International Shopping Guide Additional Content

Wondering how to get to the market?  Or what time the Co-op closes?  Look no further as below is all the info you need on the shops and supermarkets featured in Sofia’s guide:

The Co-operative Food Store

Where: 132 Cardigan Rd, Leeds

How to get there: Take either the no. 56 bus from the university, or walk down St. Michael’s Lane, then onto Cardigan Rd from Headingley.

Opening Times: open 24 hours (apart from Sunday, 10:00-16:00)

Phone no: 0113 278 5575


Where: 12-16 Arndale Centre, Headingley

How to get there: Take either the 1, 28, 95, 96 or 97A.  There’s a bus stop directly opposite the store.

Opening Times: Mon-Sat 08:00-22:00 / Sun 11:00-17:00

Phone no: 0113 214 2200


Where: Holt Rd, Holt Park, Leeds

How to get there: Take either the no. 1 or 96 straight to the store.

Opening Times: Mon-Sat 08:00-22:00 / Sun 10:00-16:00

Phone no: 0844 894 1234

Wing Lee Hong Oriental Supermarket

Where: 117 Vicar Lane, Leeds

How to get there: Take either the no. 1, 28, 95 or 96 into town, then walk to Vicar Lane.

Opening Times: Mon-Sun 10:00-18:00

Phone no: 0113 2430500

Abu Bakar International Supermarket

Where: 37 Queen’s Rd, Hyde Park

How to get there: Take the no. 56 to Hyde Park, then walk.

Opening Times: Mon-Sat 09:00-21:00

For more information, check out the University of Leeds’ International Student Handbook. It’s full of useful advice all about making your stay in Leeds (and the U.K.) even better!

2009: A Local Food Odyssey

Thursday, January 22nd, 2009

What made you believe in being a local shopper?

I think it began because I’m generally passionate about food so I enjoy the experience  of going out and exploring and finding new shops. So it really grew from there, I found going to the local traders much more enjoyable than going to big supermarkets. Generally the people in the independent shops know the products better and get to know you as well, which is a touch I really like.

Why do you feel it’s important more students shop locally?

There are thousands of students moving into communities in cities across the country every year. All too often we just move into the area and live there for 3 years only going to the local supermarket. I think wouldn’t it give the local economy a huge boost if even half of those students decided to get most of their shopping from local butchers and green grocers that source from local farms? It really is sad to see in some areas all the closed down shops that were once part of a thriving community.

What do you think is stopping more students shopping locally?

Mostly I think knowledge – students don’t know where to find the shops, maybe don’t even know they’re even there. I also think in some cases there is a bit of fear in that lots of people don’t know what to ask for in a butchers so they don’t try. Hopefully they’ll see from the film it’s not daunting at all. On the other hand though I can see why some people stick to the security of the supermarket – because they source from all over the world they’re rarely out of stock and you can get things out of season, whereas shopping locally you do have to buy more seasonally.

Going, Going, Gone?: Shopping Locally In Liverpool

Tuesday, January 20th, 2009

When it comes to the battle between the independent food shop or the supermarket, it’s pretty obvious who’s got the upper hand.  While independent stores have more knowledgeable staff and generally fresher produce, they are often more expensive and have limited opening hours, not to mention their scattered locations across the town or city.  Supermarkets, on the other hand, are ironically now on every street corner, taking the place of the corner shop.  They’re open for longer, have more variety and now sell not only food, but books, TVs, petrol and insurance.  They truly are a one stop shop for everything you need in your modern life.

For every £10 spent on the high street, £7 is spent at a supermarket, so it’s no wonder that independent greengrocers, butchers and fishmongers are drastically on the decline.  But how did this all happen?

It started in the 50s when an idea from the States came across the ocean and spread in Britain.  Instead of going into a shop and being served by a shopkeeper, the idea was reversed and the customer became their own server, having more time to think about and choose the products they wanted.  Supermarkets became incredibly popular because they needed fewer staff (and therefore lower staff costs), allowed more products to be stored (meaning greater bargaining power with the suppliers), and ultimately created greater choice for the customer.

As this choice grew, naturally so did the size of the supermarkets, meaning many were set up out of the city centre.  Even though they were now out of town, they tempted customers from any independent stores left on the high street by staying open for longer and providing car park spaces.

As their success and profits grew, soon they became the only output for supplier’s products, and with this monopoly, were able to have more control over supplier’s prices.  Suppliers were left with a choice-sell large amounts of their products to supermarkets who wanted it at a low price, or sell a few boxes to a little store who were willing to pay a bit more but would sell far far less.

Supermarkets’ convenience in location and what they sold along with their competitive pricing quickly put an end to the popularity of independent shops.  But should we be that bothered that these little stores are closing down?  After all, isn’t it the independent shops’ inability to keep up with consumer change that’s part of their downfall?

The one thing that independent stores have and supermarkets sorely miss is their level of customer care and the roots that independent stores have with the local economy.  Greengrocers, fishmongers and butchers will all be experts in their trades, knowing how to prepare, cook and store all their products.  They’ll be able to advise you on the best way of cooking what you buy, are more likely to give you discounts or give you items for free, and generally take more care over the service you receive.  They have to do more to keep you as a customer.  Generally, they’ll also source their ingredients locally, putting more money back into the local economy, financially helping the people that produce the food you eat, and keeping down emissions by lowering travelling miles and costs.

But is there a place for these independent shops on today’s high street?  It’s difficult to see how they can survive under such strong competition from the big supermarket chains, especially when supermarkets are more conveniently located and have longer opening hours.  The irony now is that supermarkets are now moving back onto the high street and opening up ‘Metro’ versions of their stores, now replacing the independent corner shops that sell milk at 10 at night.  Independent shops have got a big fight ahead of them to keep their place on the high street.

If you want to find out more about the places Rachel visited on the film here are some links to their websites:

Shopping in Sheffers

Wednesday, October 15th, 2008

There are loads of other markets and great shopping areas all around Sheffield as well as the ones Tom showed us on his tour. It’s fun to get out there and find them for yourself but just to point you in the right direction, we’d recommend checking out the Sheffield City Council website (info on ALL the markets – v useful!), as well as Sheffield Central.