Posts Tagged ‘Korean Food’

Ophirs Korean Experience

Wednesday, August 26th, 2009

The food I cooked with Joey has really opened my mind to try and experiment with other Korean dishes. I really like to cook for people so I re-created the recipe from the film recently for a group of my friends. Like me they hadn’t really eaten Korean food before and also like me really liked it!

I’ve actually started cooking a lot more Asian food. I like cooking it because ingredients are used in such different ways to most western cooking so it can be a challenge but it also teaches you a lot about how diverse some ingredients are. I think it’s nice to cook my own Asian food as it’s so different to the Asian food lots of takeaways sell. The flavours are far more prominent and the grease is kept to a minimum.

Experimenting with other cuisines is something I think everyone should try – generally I think you find that it isn’t as hard as it seems at first. Even if it is really hard it doesn’t matter if you mess up – just make sure you do that on a practise run, NOT when you’re cooking for friends!.

Country Cooks At Imperial: From Korea with Love

Friday, March 13th, 2009

Joey: I won’t pretend that I wasn’t slightly intimidated by Ophir’s experience of cooking at the start! I wouldn’t consider myself to be a master chef but I like to think I can hold my own. However, hearing of Ophir’s work experience in a professional kitchen added a whole lot of pressure.

Thankfully, that feeling quickly disappeared as I started to chop up my ingredients. I was eager to prove myself and demonstrate a whole new world of cooking that even the top Western chefs often overlook. It’s funny how things never go according to plan.

I was taken back when we had to switch dishes to say the least. Prior to making the film I had eaten a lot of risotto but not cooked a lot of it. I was thankful that Ophir had left such good directions to follow. I felt rather bad that I couldn’t reciprocate- cooking good Asian food isn’t so much following a step-by-step recipe and exact amounts as cooking by ‘feeling’, requiring some experience. But you have to start somewhere!

I think I did well with the risotto considering I’d never cooked it on my own before. I have full confidence in my cooking ability but everybody gets nervous when doing things for the first time. Now, risotto has become one of my signature dishes, especially seafood risotto with paprika, which I actually preferred to the mushroom recipe I cooked in the film. I hope Ophir has tried cooking more Asian food since the filming. He seemed to enjoy the challenge and he’s a confident cook so I think with practice he could conjure up some tasty dishes.

Who eats a food like this?

Thursday, February 12th, 2009

Thousand Year Old Eggs – China

Despite it’s name the eggs are not in fact a thousand years old. They’re created

by burying them in ash and salt for 100 days! This makes the white go grey and smell really quite awful. An acquired taste I don’t think anyone would really want to acquire.

Surströmming – Sweden

This is everyone’s favourite…fermented herring in a can. Most notable for it’s over bearing odour and famously banned by many airlines because of it! The herring is fermented for 2 months in barrels before being canned where the fermentation doesn’t stop. Oh no it continues until you gulp down one of these delicious slippery, slimy and stinking fish.

Isaw Manok – The Philippines

‘What pray tell is Isaw Manok?’ I can hear you ask. Well I can tell you that it’s barbequed chicken intestines on a skewer. Enough said.

Turtle Soup – Singapore

Are you having some problems with your ‘mojo’? Well take a leaf out of a Singaporean’s little book of sex tips and try the sex inducing aphrodisiac that is Turtle Soup. Despite turtles being close to extinction it is still cooked into a broth with Chinese herbs and made into a thick tasty soup. Mmmmm!

Nattō – Japan

It’s morning in Japan and I’m hungry for some breakfast, however I’m all out of cornflakes and there’s not a bacon sandwich in sight. I know I’ll just have some Nattō. Delicious fermented soybeans. Although they are a great source of protein, they’re smelly and sticky so I think I’d remain hungry till lunch…when I’ll ‘enjoy’ some raw fish.

Full English Breakfast – England

Although to a Brit this would entice many an ‘mmmmm’ to many international students it entices much confusion about why on earth we would want to start our day with such a lot of fatty fried food. In addition to this we throw in some fried pigs blood in the form of black pudding.

If you’ve got any experience of eating any of these or have something you think should be added we want to know!

Top 10 Essential Student Ingredients

Wednesday, October 8th, 2008

With all the great choice of stuff you can get at the market, it’s easy to get carried away and just concentrate on the main thing you need for your dish. There are, however, some essential things you will need to be the base for most meals that you should ALWAYS have in your cupboard!

Here’s out top 10:

Pasta – whether it’s spaghetti, pasta, fusilli, macaroni…it doesn’t matter. Takes about 15 minutes to boil and has the carbs you need in a balanced diet.
Garlic – Break off the cloves as and when you need them, and if it’s kept in your cupboard where it’s cool and dark, it will last around 6 weeks.
Onions – You’ll use them a lot, so make sure you’ve got two or three in your cupboard. They’ll last about two weeks.
Herbs – You can really get into herbs (legal ones!!) as they each add their own flavour to your dishes, and can really boost an ordinary meal. But, as we’re on a budget, we’ve just got a packet of mixed dried herbs. Because they’re dried, they’ll last ages.
Tin of chopped tomatoes – always useful to have. A quick fix for spag bol and lasagne.
Stock cubes – Whether they’re veg, chicken or beef, these are useful. Just crumble them into a bowl, add boiling water and stir. They’ll add flavour to your dishes and soups.
Olive oil – one thing you should try and spend a bit of money on, as a good one will make a lot of difference to your cooking. You’ll only use a small bit at a time so it’ll keep.
Salt and pepper – Whenever you boil rice, pasta or potatoes, you’ll need a pinch of salt in there and you can season your food when you eat.