Archive for the ‘Loughborough’ Category

Food For Love Outtakes

Tuesday, February 16th, 2010

food for love outtakes

More Info on Food Shopping in Loughborough

Friday, January 22nd, 2010

Even though it has a small town centre, Loughborough has got loads to offer when it comes to food shopping, especially when you’re looking for international ingredients.  Here’s a run down of what Pawel and Tas featured in the film:

Iceland

Where: 21 Market St, Loughborough

Opening times:

Mon-Sat 09:00-18:00

Sun 10:00-16:00

Phone no: 01509 237 103

Somerfield

Where: 8 Market St, Loughborough

Opening Times:

Mon-Wed & Fri-Sat 07:00-19:00

Thu & Sun 10:00-16:00

Phone no: 01509 230 484

Sainsbury’s

Where: Ashby Rd, Loughborough

Opening Times:

Mon-Sat 08:00-22:00

Sun 10:00-16:00

Phone no: 01509 237 724

Oriental Food Shop

Where: Ashby Square

Opening Times:

Mon-Sat 10:00-18:00

Sun CLOSED

Phone no: 01509 219 625

Loughborough Market

Where: Loughborough town centre

Opening Times:

Thu & Sat 07:00-17:00

More info: http://www.charnwood.gov.uk/pages/markets

Loughborough Student Union Shop

Where: Student union

Opening Times:

Mon-Fri: 08:30-22:30

Sat: 08:30-17:30

Sun: 10:30-17:30

Phone no: 01509 635 000 (Student union switchboard)

More info on the Sprint Bus

The Sprint Bus stops at the following bus stops on Loughborough University campus:

1. Outside the Student Union

2. Outside the Mechanical Engineering building

3. Outside the Pilkington Library

Buses run every 10 minutes Monday to Friday, but less frequently on the weekend.  It costs £1.20 to get into town and £1.50 to get to the train station.  Return tickets are not available.

The journey should take 10 minutes from campus to town and 20 minutes from campus to the train station, however this is depending on traffic and can take longer.  To find out more, visit: http://www.kinchbus.co.uk/

Hani’s Paneer Masala Recipe

Wednesday, December 9th, 2009

Loughborough Second To Naan

Paneer Masala Recipe

Serves: 4-6

Vegetarian: Yes

Vegan: No

Ingredients:

- 2 blocks of Paneer (227g x2) cut into small cubes (found in cheese aisle

in supermarket)

- 3 Peppers- large diced (green, red & yellow)

- 2 fairly large onions- finely chopped

- 3 tomatoes- finely chopped

- 8 cloves of garlic- grated

- 2 to 3 small green chillies- finely chopped

- 2 teaspoons salt

- 2 teaspoons paprika powder

- 2 teaspoons garam masala

- 1 teaspoon ground cumin

- 1 teaspoon ground coriander

- 1/2 teaspoon turmeric powder

- Cooking oil

- Spring onions to garnish

Method:

1. Shallow fry the pieces of paneer until golden brown. Place cooked paneer

pieces into water and leave to one side.

2. In a new pan heat 6/7 tablespoons of oil. Add the grated garlic and

chillies. Cook until garlic is slightly golden.

3. Add in chopped onions. Keep mixing and cook until onions are golden brown.

4. Add in chopped tomatoes, salt, paprika, garam masala, ground cumin, ground

coriander and turmeric powder.  Stir well.

5. Add in peppers. Stir well. Place lid on pan to help cook peppers quicker

and keep moisture in. Keep stirring in between to prevent sticking.

6. Once peppers are cooked, drain the paneer and add it to the  mixture. Stir

well and until paneer pieces are heated through.

7. Garnish with chopped spring onions. Serve hot with naan bread.  Enjoy!

Jon’s Malaysian Tea

Monday, November 16th, 2009

Jon kindly found the time to show us how to make a traditional Malaysian Tea. To see the video click the link below:

Jon’s Malaysian Tea

A Guide to Your Fridge

Thursday, August 27th, 2009

When you’re an all round athlete, training for the London Marathon, you need to be at the peak of your health.  You need a dedicated mindset, training every day and taking care of your diet, repeating the wise words of Gillian McKeith-’you are what you eat.’  Or take skier Joe Munroe’s more relaxed approach.  When your fridge contains nothing more than toothpaste, a loaf of mouldy bread and a skidmark, we think Joe’s taking the piste.

With the marathon approaching faster than a visit from Loughborough council’s health and hygiene department, studentcooking.tv stepped in and did the only thing best for Joe’s fridge.  Pimped it out.

So here’s our guide as to what Debbie put in there and why.

Chicken
Full of protein and so easy to cook.  Just whack it in the oven at 200°C for about an hour and half.  No other preparation needed (other than removing the packaging…)  To check if it’s cooked, push your knife into the thickest part of the chicken.  If the juices run clear, it’s cooked.  If not, keep it in for another 15 minutes.  We got our chicken from Loughborough Market.  The butcher there will know exactly where the chicken’s come from, the farmer who reared them and the conditions in which they were reared.  If you’re concerned about battery farmed chickens or eggs, go to your local butcher.

Fish
One of the healthiest foods you can eat,  fish is amazing for you.  Most people don’t buy fish because they don’t know how to cook it though.  An easy way is to squeeze some lemon juice, salt and pepper over it then grill it.  If you want to know more, go to your local fishmonger, they’re the experts and they’re dead friendly.  They’ll be able to tell you the best way on how to cook any type of fish and if you ask nicely, will probably give you a student discount.

Fresh vegetables
Again, all from the local market.  We went there at the end of the day and got some real bargains.  The last thing traders want to do is take loads of produce back home with them, so they’ll sell it at a really low price, just to get rid of it.  You can use vegetables in loads of dishes, but possibly the easiest is a stir fry.  Simply chop everything up, a drop of oil in the pan, get the pan hot and then just stir and fry.  Serve with rice or noodles, it’ll taste great.

Have you got a fridge that’s in need of a pimpin?  Then let us know, get in touch by hitting the Feedback button on the Contact Us page.

International Cook-Off. The Judges View…

Thursday, May 7th, 2009

We first started planning International Cooking Competition as we thought it would be very facinating to find out how people in other countries cook and present their dishes. I told myself “It would definitely be very exciting and taste-rewarding”. And indeed, we had a very positive response from Loughborough’s International Students with lots of them eager to show off the best cuisine their country has to offer. We quickly got the teams signed up and the day of the competition was soon upon us!

On the day, the atmosphere in the kitchen was nervous, hyperactive and friendly. Contestants had to multitask, watching over their pans and pots as well as peeking what other countries were doing. Of course the best and at the same time the hardest part of the competition was the tasting and judging. It was evident that everyone and poured their patriotism into their work and done their best countires culinary pride, and every single meal was in its own way delightful and exotic. The true International Spirit or you may say flavour, could be felt in every meal and each one presented us we a new flavour we’d never tasted before.. Even though it was hard, we picked a winner and thankfully none of the contestants felt bad or upset!

Overall I think that during these two hectic hours, whilst running around the kitchen and asking fellow contestants for a spare egg or some cooking oil, people became good friends. The event was a great success and opened up a lot of peoples eyes to the huge exotic and exciting variety of food they’re able to cook.

Student Cooking.Tv’s International Food Cook-Off: The View from the Podium

Tuesday, May 5th, 2009

Sara: Participating in the ISA cooking competition was one of my best experiences at Loughborough University. I was very excited when I found out that I was to be one of the competitors, but then I was told that we will have only 45 minutes to cook and it seemed impossible! However with the help of my housemate Annelore I planned to make carrot sauté (Fried grated carrots served with yogurt and garlic mixture) and spinach sauté (Steamed spinach with fried egg served with yogurt and garlic mixture) as a starter and, Tah-chin (Rice stuffed with chicken and lots of saffron with a special yogurt sauce) as the main dish. For dessert I thought a Shiraz salad which is a mixture of tomato, cucumber and onion with lemon juice and olive oil would catch someone’s attention. In truth is was too much for 45 minutes and I wasn’t sure that we could make it, but we planned for every 5 minutes and crossed our fingers!

I didn’t know until the day that the studentcooking team were coming along to film making it much more stressful (and more fun too!!). It was my first time cooking in such a big kitchen despite it being something I’d always wanted to do.

Soon the time to worry was over and the time started and we got cooking! My main memory was how incredibly hot it was in the kitchen, but who cared! It was the competition and we were too busy to complain about it! And just as quickly as it began -  “3, 2, 1! Time is over!” and we downed tools. We were right on time, and to my surprise had managed to cook all the food we planned.

The hardest part however was yet to come…take the food to the judges! I was pleased with the food but that did nothing to calm my nerves. Shortly after this my hard worked had proved worthwhile when I heard Iranian cuisine was the winner!
As if the pride of being the winner wasn’t enough we also got chocolate, champagne and some Diners+ cards (all of which we suitably enjoyed!!!).

What a Load of Amazing Rubbish!

Sunday, March 8th, 2009

Hayley : I’ve always known the importance of recycling, but it’s something that I’ve never really paid much attention to.  I know you should do it, but I always find it difficult to make it a habit.  But after visiting the recycling site, it’s really brought home how important recycling is.  I’ve never seen so much rubbish in one place and to think that it can all be used again is pretty amazing!
Has it changed my views about recycling?  Yes, I’d say so.  Like most people, I did recycle, but it was something I did on the off chance, and didn’t really make it a habit.  Now, I’m going to make it a habit-it’s not really hard to do, but it makes a big difference to the environment.

The Carnivore and the Carrot

Tuesday, January 13th, 2009

When I first took on the vegan challenge I thought I was just not allowed to eat meat and fish, but when I found out that I couldn’t eat any type of food from an animal source, I realised it was going to be even tougher to go three days following a strict vegan diet. Even for foods you would assume to be vegan, like a bag of crisps, often contained some sort of animal product, and so I found myself having to check every food label. During the challenge I started having to eat foods I would not normally consider, such as soya milk, which I think would take a bit of getting used to! Being a footballer for Loughborough University and keen sportsman, I try to take in plenty of protein and carbohydrate in my diet and so have always thought that vegetarian and vegan diets were unhealthy because they lacked meat, which is high in protein. I realised from doing the challenge just how limiting a vegan diet is in what you can eat, but at the same time, although it is maybe more difficult and time consuming, it is still possible to eat a varied and balanced diet by making up for the vitamins and protein in meat and eggs by eating plenty of vegetables, nuts and soya. Although I can safely say that I won’t be becoming a vegan soon and am going to carry on eating meat!

Summer version of a vegan lasagne

Sunday, January 11th, 2009

Summer version of a vegan lasagne
Preparation time: approx 1.5 hrs + 45 minutes oven time
The list of ingredients is extensive, but most of them are optional, depending how you like your lasagne. Time-saving tips and ideas for seasonal variation are given at the end of the recipe below.
Serves 6 – 10, depending on hunger and what else is on the menu (see below for details).
Red sauce:
1/2 cup dried pulses or 1 can, drained
1 vegetable stock cube (double-check to make sure it doesn’t contain animal products)
oil for frying
1 large white onion, cubed
1 small red onion, cubed
4 cloves of garlic, well chopped
1 leek, sliced
2 carrots, quarted lengthwise and sliced
1 aubergine, quarted lengthwise and sliced
1 250 g packet of firm tofu, drained, squeezed dry and chopped in bite-size pieces
1 courgette, shredded
1 green pepper, chopped
1/2 packet of brown mushrooms (ca. 8 medium-sized), chopped
150 g tomato puree
1 bottle tomato passata (680 g) or 2 cans chopped tomatoes (800 g)
1 tbsp peanut butter
1 tsp Fairtrade cane sugar
2 tsp dried basil
4 tsp mixed herbs
salt + pepper to taste
White sauce:
4 tbsp vegan margarine or vegetable oil
10 tbsp white flour
500 ml soy milk
500 ml water or vegetable water
1 tsp nutmeg
salt + pepper to taste
Topping:
50 g breadcrumbs or stuffing
2 tbsp sunflower seeds
drizzle of olive oil
1 packet whole wheat lasagne (250 g)
Red sauce:
If using dried pulses (preferred), rinse, soak and pre-cook them with the vegetable stock cube according to the package instructions. Any can be used, though red lentils are not great. I prefer red kidney beans, green lentils (easy because they require no soaking), or chickpeas. Take them off the heat and pour off and save the cooking water when they’ve still got a bit of ‘bite’ left.
Prepare most of the vegetables beforehand to make putting the red sauce together easier.
Start by heating up a large saucepan (about 3 litres) with a few tbsp of vegetable oil. Fry the onion and garlic for a few minutes till they’re soft. Don’t be afraid to turn the heat up pretty high if you’re happy stirring very often. Add each of the vegetables and tofu in turn, giving them each a minute or so before adding the next, in approximately the order given above. Keep stirring happily. If needed, add a little more oil to avoid sticking, but don’t worry if it looks like it’s starting to burn. Just keep stirring and adding vegetables.
When all the vegetables have been added, pour in the tomato passata (like chopped tomatoes, just more blitzed). If you prefer chopped tomatoes, that’s fine too. Add tomato pureee, basil and herbs, peanut butter (optional), sugar (not optional. The sugar balances the acidity of the tomatoes and is key to a good red sauce), salt and pepper, and if canned pulses are used, a vegetable stock cube. You will probably need to add another 100-200 ml of water as well. The consistency should be like that of thick soup. Turn the heat down and let the sauce simmer, stirring occasionally, while you make the white sauce. Add the pulses at this point too.
White sauce:
Melt the margarine in a small saucepan or heat up the oil gently. It should not get hot to the point of excessive sizzling or boiling of the margarine. When all is melted, add the flour a few tbsp at a time, stirring well with a wooden spoon. It should sizzle a bit. When all the flour has been added, you should have a ball of doughlike consistency in the saucepan, about the size of a small fist. If it’s too dry, add more margarine, or add flour if it still seems ‘wet’. Start adding the liquid, alternating between soy milk and water. If there is pulse-water leftover from earlier, you can use this instead of the water, or if you’ve steamed or cooked any other vegetable, use the water from that. If you want a creamier sauce, just stick with soy milk, though I find it too heavy. Add only about 150 ml at a time and stir really well to get out all the lumps before adding the next lot. It’s time-consuming but worth it in the end. If it starts to boil, turn the heat down a bit. When all the liquid has been added, add salt, pepper and nutmeg and let the sauce simmer for a few minutes, while stirring. If there are lumps, you can use a whisk, but there shouldn’t really be any. The sauce will be thin at the top and thick at the bottom, so make sure you’re stirring all the way to the bottom of the sauce pan.
Putting the lasagne together:
Preheat the oven to 200 degrees C. Use a large oven-proof dish of at least 5 cm depth. Mine is ceramic and about 25 by 30 cm and works a charm. Give the red sauce a good stir, and pour half of it into the bottom of the dish. Add half the lasagne, then half the white sauce. Follow on with the rest of the red sauce, lasagne and finish with the white. Sprinkle breadcrumbs or stuffing (I like sage and onion) and sunflower seeds on top and drizzle some olive oil on top. Bake in the middle of the oven for about 45 minutes. Stick a knife through the layers to test when it’s cooked. If the top looks like it’s starting to burn before the lasagne is done, cover it with tin foil.
Serves 8 when mixed with generous helpings of a nice fresh salad (lettuce, tomato, cucumber, pepper, shredded carrot, avocado etc) in a balsamic vinaigrette. If your guests are really hungry or you want to stretch the lasagne to 10 servings, add in a bread basket with vegan ciabatta or other italian style bread.
Tips + variations:
The vegetables above are for a summer lasagne, when all these vegetables can be locally sourced. In autumn and winter, finely chopped cabbage, spinach, and shredded root vegetables such as parsnip, swede, and beetroot, can be used instead. Pre-steamed cabbage and spinach can even be used in betweeen layers as a nice change of pace. Spread them out on top of the first white layer.
If all this sounds too time-consuming, it’s possible to substiute the entire vat of red sauce for a good-quality vegan pasta sauce, but it won’t be nearly as good! Alternatively, use more tofu and pulses as filler (or even soy crumbles!) and leave out many of the vegetables. Onion, garlic, chopped carrot and zucchini are all quick and easy to prepare and will still give variety in colour, taste and consistency and give you some of your 5 a day.
The whole recipe can also be scaled down, though it’s not really worth it to make it for less than 4 helpings.

Preparation time: approx 1.5 hrs + 45 minutes oven time

The list of ingredients is extensive, but most of them are optional, depending how you like your lasagne. Time-saving tips and ideas for seasonal variation are given at the end of the recipe below.

Serves 6 – 10, depending on hunger and what else is on the menu (see below for details).

Red sauce:

1/2 cup dried pulses or 1 can, drained

1 vegetable stock cube (double-check to make sure it doesn’t contain animal products)

oil for frying

1 large white onion, cubed

1 small red onion, cubed

4 cloves of garlic, well chopped

1 leek, sliced

2 carrots, quarted lengthwise and sliced

1 aubergine, quarted lengthwise and sliced

1 250 g packet of firm tofu, drained, squeezed dry and chopped in bite-size pieces

1 courgette, shredded

1 green pepper, chopped

1/2 packet of brown mushrooms (ca. 8 medium-sized), chopped

150 g tomato puree

1 bottle tomato passata (680 g) or 2 cans chopped tomatoes (800 g)

1 tbsp peanut butter

1 tsp Fairtrade cane sugar

2 tsp dried basil

4 tsp mixed herbs

salt + pepper to taste

White sauce:

4 tbsp vegan margarine or vegetable oil

10 tbsp white flour

500 ml soy milk

500 ml water or vegetable water

1 tsp nutmeg

salt + pepper to taste

Topping:

50 g breadcrumbs or stuffing

2 tbsp sunflower seeds

drizzle of olive oil

1 packet whole wheat lasagne (250 g)

Red sauce:

If using dried pulses (preferred), rinse, soak and pre-cook them with the vegetable stock cube according to the package instructions. Any can be used, though red lentils are not great. I prefer red kidney beans, green lentils (easy because they require no soaking), or chickpeas. Take them off the heat and pour off and save the cooking water when they’ve still got a bit of ‘bite’ left.

Prepare most of the vegetables beforehand to make putting the red sauce together easier.

Start by heating up a large saucepan (about 3 litres) with a few tbsp of vegetable oil. Fry the onion and garlic for a few minutes till they’re soft. Don’t be afraid to turn the heat up pretty high if you’re happy stirring very often. Add each of the vegetables and tofu in turn, giving them each a minute or so before adding the next, in approximately the order given above. Keep stirring happily. If needed, add a little more oil to avoid sticking, but don’t worry if it looks like it’s starting to burn. Just keep stirring and adding vegetables.

When all the vegetables have been added, pour in the tomato passata (like chopped tomatoes, just more blitzed). If you prefer chopped tomatoes, that’s fine too. Add tomato pureee, basil and herbs, peanut butter (optional), sugar (not optional. The sugar balances the acidity of the tomatoes and is key to a good red sauce), salt and pepper, and if canned pulses are used, a vegetable stock cube. You will probably need to add another 100-200 ml of water as well. The consistency should be like that of thick soup. Turn the heat down and let the sauce simmer, stirring occasionally, while you make the white sauce. Add the pulses at this point too.

White sauce:

Melt the margarine in a small saucepan or heat up the oil gently. It should not get hot to the point of excessive sizzling or boiling of the margarine. When all is melted, add the flour a few tbsp at a time, stirring well with a wooden spoon. It should sizzle a bit. When all the flour has been added, you should have a ball of doughlike consistency in the saucepan, about the size of a small fist. If it’s too dry, add more margarine, or add flour if it still seems ‘wet’. Start adding the liquid, alternating between soy milk and water. If there is pulse-water leftover from earlier, you can use this instead of the water, or if you’ve steamed or cooked any other vegetable, use the water from that. If you want a creamier sauce, just stick with soy milk, though I find it too heavy. Add only about 150 ml at a time and stir really well to get out all the lumps before adding the next lot. It’s time-consuming but worth it in the end. If it starts to boil, turn the heat down a bit. When all the liquid has been added, add salt, pepper and nutmeg and let the sauce simmer for a few minutes, while stirring. If there are lumps, you can use a whisk, but there shouldn’t really be any. The sauce will be thin at the top and thick at the bottom, so make sure you’re stirring all the way to the bottom of the sauce pan.

Putting the lasagne together:

Preheat the oven to 200 degrees C. Use a large oven-proof dish of at least 5 cm depth. Mine is ceramic and about 25 by 30 cm and works a charm. Give the red sauce a good stir, and pour half of it into the bottom of the dish. Add half the lasagne, then half the white sauce. Follow on with the rest of the red sauce, lasagne and finish with the white. Sprinkle breadcrumbs or stuffing (I like sage and onion) and sunflower seeds on top and drizzle some olive oil on top. Bake in the middle of the oven for about 45 minutes. Stick a knife through the layers to test when it’s cooked. If the top looks like it’s starting to burn before the lasagne is done, cover it with tin foil.

Serves 8 when mixed with generous helpings of a nice fresh salad (lettuce, tomato, cucumber, pepper, shredded carrot, avocado etc) in a balsamic vinaigrette. If your guests are really hungry or you want to stretch the lasagne to 10 servings, add in a bread basket with vegan ciabatta or other italian style bread.

Tips + variations:

The vegetables above are for a summer lasagne, when all these vegetables can be locally sourced. In autumn and winter, finely chopped cabbage, spinach, and shredded root vegetables such as parsnip, swede, and beetroot, can be used instead. Pre-steamed cabbage and spinach can even be used in betweeen layers as a nice change of pace. Spread them out on top of the first white layer.

If all this sounds too time-consuming, it’s possible to substiute the entire vat of red sauce for a good-quality vegan pasta sauce, but it won’t be nearly as good! Alternatively, use more tofu and pulses as filler (or even soy crumbles!) and leave out many of the vegetables. Onion, garlic, chopped carrot and zucchini are all quick and easy to prepare and will still give variety in colour, taste and consistency and give you some of your 5 a day.

The whole recipe can also be scaled down, though it’s not really worth it to make it for less than 4 helpings.